Sam patch the famous jumper chapter 1 summary

5.19  ·  2,539 ratings  ·  722 reviews
sam patch the famous jumper chapter 1 summary

Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper by Paul E. Johnson

The true history of a legendary American folk hero

In the 1820s, a fellow named Sam Patch grew up in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, working there (when he wasnt drinking) as a mill hand for one of Americas new textile companies. Sam made a name for himself one day by jumping seventy feet into the tumultuous waters below Pawtucket Falls. When in 1827 he repeated the stunt in Paterson, New Jersey, another mill town, an even larger audience gathered to cheer on the daredevil they would call the Jersey Jumper. Inevitably, he went to Niagara Falls, where in 1829 he jumped not once but twice in front of thousands who had paid for a good view.

The distinguished social historian Paul E. Johnson gives this deceptively simple story all its deserved richness, revealing in its characters and social settings a virtual microcosm of Jacksonian America. He also relates the real jumper to the mythic Sam Patch who turned up as a daring moral hero in the works of Hawthorne and Melville, in London plays and pantomimes, and in the spotlight with Davy Crockett-a Sam Patch who became the namesake of Andrew Jacksons favorite horse.

In his shrewd and powerful analysis, Johnson casts new light on aspects of American society that we may have overlooked or underestimated. This is innovative American history at its best.
File Name: sam patch the famous jumper chapter 1 summary.zip
Size: 21905 Kb
Published 11.08.2019

One Minute Video Exploring Decew Falls , ericacassellaphotography.comines , Ontario

Questions?

In the s, a fellow named Sam Patch grew up in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, working there when he wasn't drinking as a mill hand for one of America's new textile companies. Sam made a name for himself one day by jumping seventy feet into the tumultuous waters below Pawtucket Falls. When in he repeated the stunt in Paterson, New Jersey, another mill town, an even larger audience gathered to cheer on the daredevil they would call the "Jersey Jumper. The distinguished social historian Paul E. Johnson gives this deceptively simple story all its deserved richness, revealing in its characters and social settings a virtual microcosm of Jacksonian America. He also relates the real jumper to the mythic Sam Patch who turned up as a daring moral hero in the works of Hawthorne and Melville, in London plays and pantomimes, and in the spotlight with Davy Crockett-a Sam Patch who became the namesake of Andrew Jackson's favorite horse. In his shrewd and powerful analysis, Johnson casts new light on aspects of American society that we may have overlooked or underestimated.

I still wish I could have taken that class, but I teach dance on Monday nights I had thought it was originally scheduled Wednesdays, but later checked and saw the Monday-night listing and was bummed! Post a Comment. Though less known than its gigantic cousin to the west, the High Falls was and remains a treacherous cataract. For the rest of the nineteenth century his story would be told in songs, in plays, and in books—many of these stories deliberately or inadvertently falsifying the life that, when it came right down to it, few knew. When not working at the mill, Patch, along with other Pawtucket boys, made daredevil leaps from Pawtucket Falls. To these boys, this was a craft—one that involved practice and skill.

Thank you! Episodes in the earlyth-century life of daredevil Sam Patch demonstrate both his nose-thumbing at the pretensions of mill owners and his evolution into a piece of vernacular American celebrity. By any standards, Patch had rough early years, working as a hand in the cotton mills of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. In the s, to inject a little thrill into his life, he and a few friends would leap from the roof of a mill feet into the moiling waters of Pawtucket Falls. Johnson co-author, The Kingdom of Matthias , suggests that these leaps were acts of class outlawry, timed to disrupt the opening of a private park on what had been public land, or to throw light upon various labor struggles.

KIRKUS REVIEW

Best known for leaping off a ladder into the seething falls at Niagara, Sam Patch was a working-class kid who loved to jump and found out he could earn a few bucks by drawing a crowd. Still, it took extraordinary guts to make the eighty-some-foot leap, and Sam was one of the few who tried it.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. Johnson shows the many different attitudes toward Sam Patch. It displays certain attitudes toward Sam Patch and his jumps. Some people are amazed by his jumps and think the world of him; others poke fun at him and use every mishap by Sam to derail him from his practices. Sam Patch became a celebrity in America through his many successful jumps.

Little is known of daredevil Sam Patch — When he was seven, Patch, his mother and siblings were working in the mills of Pawtucket, R. The waterfalls that powered the mills attracted working boys like Sam, who'd compete at jumping from the heights. In his mids, Patch moved to Paterson, N. In September , he made his first spectacular jump—right over Paterson's Passaic Falls—which he repeated the following July 4, declaring his motto: "Some things can be done as well as others. Johnson, a history professor at the University of South Carolina, warns readers in his preface that Patch is a "front-porch story"—there isn't much of a story, but some interesting meanders. While Johnson makes a strong case that Patch was thumbing his nose at the capitalists with his Passaic Falls jumps, he admits that after Paterson, Patch was more interested in being a "showman and a celebrity" than in knocking anyone's politics, unless staying drunk can be interpreted as a political statement which Johnson sometimes implies.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Jaykob R. says:

    Sam Patch, The Famous Jumper By Paul E. Johnson Hill & Wang Publishers Published in Sam Patch, one of the first working-class.

  2. Mirari B. says:

    BUY THE BOOK

  3. Plodecsipa says:

    Follow by Email

  4. Rierocziti says:

    "Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper," by Paul E. Johnson Essay Example

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *