Poor old lady by anon

5.60  ·  5,093 ratings  ·  845 reviews
poor old lady by anon

The White Elephant - 11 illustrated tales from Old India by Anonymous

Herein are 11 illustrated children’s tales from Old India, all with lessons to equip children for life. In this volume you will find the stories of:
The White Elephant
The Grain of Corn
The Timid Little Rabbit
Singh Rajah and the Cunning Little Jackals
The Kingdom of Mouseland
The Alligator and the Jackal
The Bold Blackbird
The Kid and the Tiger
The Brahmin and the Tiger
The Bear’s Bad Bargain
The Man Who Rode a Tiger
These old, old tales from India have been favorites for many, many years; some have come down to us from the early days of Buddha and beyond. Some have been taken from a book, called the “Jataka Tales,” (also published by Abela Publishing) telling of the Buddha’s previous existences. Others have been translated from the Pali, or Magadhan, by Eugene Watson Burlinghame, and they have also been retold for us in attractive form by Ellen C. Babbitt.
These stories are somewhat similar to stories which we have all known in another form; for instance, our first story of “The White Elephant” is somewhat like the story of Androcles and the lion. While the story of “The Timid Little Rabbit” is like the old English tale of “Chicken Little.”
“The Story of the Grain of Corn” (which is repeated from “Tales of the Punjab” by Flora Annie Steel) compares with our well-known version of “The Old Woman and the Pig.” In this same book, we find the story of “The Bear’s Bad Bargain,” and we learn how a stupid and clumsy bear is outwitted by a grasping old woman and her greedy husband. Even if they have the best of the bargain, our sympathies are all with the poor old bear.
“The King of the Mice,” “The Bold Blackbird,” and“The Kid and the Tiger” (retold from “The Talking Thrush and Other Tales from India) are all stories of the triumph of the weak and cunning over the brutish and strong. “The Bold Blackbird” may remind you of the old French tale of“Drakesbill and His Friends.”
So sit back with a steamy beverage and be prepared to be entertained for many-an-hour.
10% of the net sale will be donated to charities by the publisher.
==============
ABOUT THE STORY LADY: Georgene Faulkner (1873 – 1958) was a native of Chicago and a prominent American childrens book author and storyteller of the early twentieth century. During her career, she was known and promoted as the Story Lady.
==============
KEYWORDS/ Tales from Old India, fairy tales, folklore, myths, legends, children’s stories, childrens stories, bygone era, fairydom, ethereal, fairy land, classic stories, children’s bedtime stories, happy place, happiness, White Elephant, Grain of Corn, Timid Little Rabbit, Singh Rajah, Cunning Little Jackals, Kingdom of Mouseland, Alligator and the Jackal, Bold Blackbird, Kid and the Tiger, Brahmin and the Tiger, Bear’s Bad Bargain, Man Who Rode a Tiger, moral tales, lessons for life, life lessons
File Name: poor old lady by anon.zip
Size: 68147 Kb
Published 04.05.2019

Burl Ives - I Know An Old Lady

Blogger Template created with Artisteer by Patricia P. Search This Blog.
Anonymous

Poor Old Lady

Poor old lady, she swallowed a fly. Poor old lady, she swallowed a spider. It squirmed and wriggled and turned inside her. She swallowed the spider to catch the fly. Poor old lady, she swallowed a bird.

I am looking for somebody to recite the well known poem 'Poor Old Lady'. It will be used as a part of an art film, so I will need permission for the recording to be exhibited. I really need this asap so please have a go! Huge thanks in advance! Poor old lady, she swallowed a fly. I don't know why she swallowed a fly. Poor old lady, I think she'll die.

The following brief analysis will examine this nursery rhyme for critical thematic elements and possible problematic components. One should note the relative banality of the opening statement: While swallowing a fly is somewhat uncommon and an unpleasant experience, it is almost certainly not fatal. The utter confusion of the author is expressed, as he or she seems to believe that the woman must have swallowed the insect on purpose. Much more likely is that she did so by accident. Whereas most observers would spend the time helping the old lady, performing first aid techniques if necessary, and calling the paramedics if serious, the author instead decides to retell the event with no indication that any help was given. As can be seen in the following stanzas, the woman is left to correct the problem herself.

Casting Call Club

For the sword outwears its sheath, And the soul wears out the breast, And the heart must pause to breathe, And love itself have rest. Poor old lady, she swallowed a fly. Poor old lady, she swallowed a spider. It squirmed and wriggled and turned inside her. She swallowed the spider to catch the fly. Poor old lady, she swallowed a bird.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Jacques T. says:

    I don't know why she swallowed a fly. Poor old lady, I think she'll die. Poor old lady, she swallowed a spider. It squirmed and wriggled and turned inside her.

  2. Leah B. says:

    12 Oct: Poor Old Lady by Anon. Poor old lady, she swallowed a dog. Poor old lady, she swallowed a fly. I don't know why she swallowed a fly.

  3. Captrawhitinc says:

    Blog Archive

  4. Lukas D. says:

    Can i live in a motorhome you getting mad and i m getting rich

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *