Insomniac city by bill hayes

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insomniac city by bill hayes

Insomniac City: New York, Oliver, and Me by Bill Hayes

Bill Hayes came to New York City in 2009 with a one-way ticket and only the vaguest idea of how he would get by. But, at forty-eight years old, having spent decades in San Francisco, he craved change. Grieving over the death of his partner, he quickly discovered the profound consolations of the citys incessant rhythms, the sight of the Empire State Building against the night sky, and New Yorkers themselves, kindred souls that Hayes, a lifelong insomniac, encountered on late-night strolls with his camera.

And he unexpectedly fell in love again, with his friend and neighbor, the writer and neurologist Oliver Sacks, whose exuberance--I dont so much fear death as I do wasting life, he tells Hayes early on--is captured in vignettes throughout. What emerges is a portrait of Sacks at his most personal and endearing, from falling in love for the first time at age seventy-five to facing illness and death (Sacks died of cancer in August 2015).
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Published 30.11.2018

Oliver Sacks: On Robin Williams and the Brain (Feb 23, 1995) - Charlie Rose

This life-expanding recompense of embracing otherness graces every meaningful relationship, be it the love of a person or the love of a place, and it comes alive with uncommon splendor in Insomniac City: New York, Oliver, and Me public library — the poetic and profound more-than-memoir by the writer and photographer Bill Hayes. After the sudden death of his partner of sixteen years, Hayes — a lifelong insomniac — leaves San Francisco for New York in search of a fresh start.
Bill Hayes

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He provides tender insights into living with both. But Sacks was by far the more eccentric of his two loves. He insisted on wearing swim goggles the first time he opened a bottle of Champagne. Shared consciousness: perhaps the ultimate fantasy of a man who tried to capture the perceptions and experiences of others. For Hayes, being the partner of a man in his 70s and then 80s meant patiently tolerating the foibles of an aging body. Sacks had a bad back sciatica and a bum knee replaced ; he was blind in one eye from his first bout with cancer, and his vision was badly compromised in the other.

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Buy from other retailers. Amazon's Best Biographies and Memoirs of List A moving celebration of what Bill Hayes calls "the evanescent, the eavesdropped, the unexpected" of life in New York City, and an intimate glimpse of his relationship with the late Oliver Sacks. But, at forty-eight years old, having spent decades in San Francisco, he craved change. Grieving over the death of his partner, he quickly discovered the profound consolations of the city's incessant rhythms, the sight of the Empire State Building against the night sky, and New Yorkers themselves, kindred souls that Hayes, a lifelong insomniac, encountered on late-night strolls with his camera. And he unexpectedly fell in love again, with his friend and neighbor, the writer and neurologist Oliver Sacks, whose exuberance--"I don't so much fear death as I do wasting life," he tells Hayes early on--is captured in funny and touching vignettes throughout.

In , following the sudden death of his partner of sixteen years, Hayes rented out his San Francisco apartment and moved to New York City. Hayes had had a passing social relationship with the neurologist Oliver Sacks, who had written him in to praise his book The Anatomist. When Hayes moved to New York, his relationship with Sacks — a fellow insomniac , and at 75 nearly thirty years his senior — soon turned romantic. Sacks had hidden his homosexuality from most people, and had lived a largely celibate life; at the start of his relationship with Hayes, it had been three and a half decades since his last romantic encounter. In Insomniac City , Hayes reverently describes Sacks' unique and curious mind.

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